Rose and Gold Greek

Gold and Rose Greek-

A peplos fashioned from a vintage silk sari- something I have meant to do for a while but ended up being far more complicated than it should… this involved lots of cutting and piecing to get the borders where I wanted them and in appropriate locations for greek.

Worn depicting a goddess for this event thus the symbology…

 

 

Historical Sew Monthly

The Challenge: Metallics

June 2017

Fabric: 100% silk (hand like organza) vintage silk sari in a rose color with gold and black block printing.

Pattern: draped on form

Year: 500 BCE

Notions: silk and gold thread

How historically accurate is it? 90% given accurate materials (albeit not saris in greece), machine sewn seams hand top stitched and finished

Hours to complete: 8 hours Total

First worn: September 23rd for battlefield bardic scenario at Battle on the Bay

Total: $25 vintage silk sari & notions from stash

 

Historical inspiration images…

Figurine of Aphrodite playing with Eros, from Tanagra, late 4th century BC (terracotta) by Greek School, (4th century BC)
terracotta

Copy of a Greek bronze statue of 375/374–360/359 B.C. by Kephisodotos

The sculptural type of a woman wearing a peplos becomes prominent during the second quarter of the fifth century B.C., especially in small bronzes. Contemporary works in terracotta on this scale are exceedingly rare. It is possible that this piece served as a model for the preparation of molds from which bronze representations would have been cast.

Ancient Greek statue of a woman with blue and gilt garment, fan and sun hat, from Tanagra, 325-300 BC

Traces of paint depicting embroidered patterns on the peplos of an Archaic kore

The willowy shape and the draping of the fabric on top of the maiden’s high, “melon” hairstyle are typically South Italian. The statuette was originally brightly painted.
3rd century BC (Hellenistic)

Greek terracotta statuette of a dancing maenad, 3rd century B.C. Made in Taranto. Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

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