Rose and Gold Greek

Gold and Rose Greek-

A peplos fashioned from a vintage silk sari- something I have meant to do for a while but ended up being far more complicated than it should… this involved lots of cutting and piecing to get the borders where I wanted them and in appropriate locations for greek.

Worn depicting a goddess for this event thus the symbology…

 

 

Historical Sew Monthly

The Challenge: Metallics

June 2017

Fabric: 100% silk (hand like organza) vintage silk sari in a rose color with gold and black block printing.

Pattern: draped on form

Year: 500 BCE

Notions: silk and gold thread

How historically accurate is it? 90% given accurate materials (albeit not saris in greece), machine sewn seams hand top stitched and finished

Hours to complete: 8 hours Total

First worn: September 23rd for battlefield bardic scenario at Battle on the Bay

Total: $25 vintage silk sari & notions from stash

 

Historical inspiration images…

Figurine of Aphrodite playing with Eros, from Tanagra, late 4th century BC (terracotta) by Greek School, (4th century BC)
terracotta

Copy of a Greek bronze statue of 375/374–360/359 B.C. by Kephisodotos

The sculptural type of a woman wearing a peplos becomes prominent during the second quarter of the fifth century B.C., especially in small bronzes. Contemporary works in terracotta on this scale are exceedingly rare. It is possible that this piece served as a model for the preparation of molds from which bronze representations would have been cast.

Ancient Greek statue of a woman with blue and gilt garment, fan and sun hat, from Tanagra, 325-300 BC

Traces of paint depicting embroidered patterns on the peplos of an Archaic kore

The willowy shape and the draping of the fabric on top of the maiden’s high, “melon” hairstyle are typically South Italian. The statuette was originally brightly painted.
3rd century BC (Hellenistic)

Greek terracotta statuette of a dancing maenad, 3rd century B.C. Made in Taranto. Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

WWI Shirtwaist Dress

WWI Shirtwaist Dress

The Great War brought austerity, simplicity, and practicality to fashion.  A simple shirtwaist dress like this could be worn as a workdress or uniform.  Many women’s uniforms were made at home from widely available patterns.  Variations in material, decoration, and fastenings were seen.  These pictures are my friend Bethany wearing the dress at the Centennial kickoff event- a bit big on her but we see ladies during the war wearing both fitted and large uniforms.  This one fits a little closer than the work smock pictured on the doughnut girl because an original nurse’s uniform was used as the pattern.  Being in a time period with machine stitching and top stitching made this a quick dress to make.

donut-girlwwi-donut-girl

Historical Sew Monthly

WWI Shirtwaist Dress

The Challenge: Firsts & Lasts This was my first shirtwaist dress, copied from original nurse’s uniform but modified to match work smocks in tan with full front buttons.

January 2017

Fabric: Cotton/Linen light twill weave

Pattern: Copied from original WWI Nurse uniform

Year: 1917

Notions: cotton thread, metal buttons

How historically accurate is it? 100% given accurate materials, machine sewn with short stitch length and hand top stitched and finished

Hours to complete: 30 hours Total

First worn: January 31st, 2016

Total: ~$10 fabric remnant, notions from stash

Historical inspiration images…

1910s-uniforms

1910s-uniforms

red-cross-unifrom closest to the original I copied for this pattern

red-cross-unifrom closest to the original I copied for this pattern

sa-in-france-during-the-war-1917 Notice work smock buttons all the way down the front

sa-in-france-during-the-war-1917
Notice work smock buttons all the way down the front

a-woman-in-the-salvation-army-holds-up-a-mold-for-cutting-donuts

a-woman-in-the-salvation-army-holds-up-a-mold-for-cutting-donuts

WWI Uniform dress- notice officer has jacket but the rest are shirtwaist dresses.- these are probably wool serge.

WWI Uniform dress- notice officer has jacket but the rest are shirtwaist dresses.- these are probably wool serge.

WWI era Corset

WWI Corset- I opted for the high bust for support but love the long line this corset creates!  This is the base for the WWI era clothing I will be making and wearing throughout the year as part of the Centennial commemoration.  This was the first wearing, without the garters (mostly because I forgot them that night) and under a skirt/blouse combo.  It also was not fully laced as I had to lace myself in and can only get so much leverage behind my back.

corset-back corset-front

Historical Sew Monthly

The Challenge: Firsts & Lasts

January 2017

Fabric: 100% cotton brocade and cotton drill lining

Pattern: 1913 late Edwardian Corset from Truly Victorian

Year: 1913

Notions: cotton thread, steel busk, bones, eyelets, garters, cotton lace, silk floss, linen tape for lacing

How historically accurate is it? 95% given accurate materials, machine sewn with short stitch length and hand top stitched and finished

Hours to complete: 43 hours Total

First worn: January 31, 2017 for Centennial Kickoff event

Total: ~$40 bought busk, steels, and garters,  fabric remnants & notions from stash

First Wearing (dancing both ragtime and swing with some WWII folks- don’t recommend swing dance in a longline corset)

wwi-dance-2 wwi-dance-3 wwi-dance wwi-single

Construction images…

corset-pieces

wwi-corset-progress

Historical inspiration images…

1915-1917 corset at the Met

1915-1917 corset at the Met

Corset - c. 1911-13 - by Au Royal Corset, Madrid, Spain

Corset – c. 1911-13 – by Au Royal Corset, Madrid, Spain

1915 Corset at the Met

1915 Corset at the Met

1865 Stripey Corset

This fabric really wanted to be a corset, even though stripes are not very period- I have enough fabric left to make a fun frilly skirt so this will likely be my “accidental steampunk” outfit.  I needed a new Victorian corset so I also fixed some fitting issues from my first one to this one- should be more comfortable for a full day’s wear and working.  I had to get photos on the dress form so the fitting isn’t quite right- it squishes in but not up!

1865 Stripey Corset

striped-corset-frontstriped-corset-back

Historical Sew Monthly

The Challenge: Pattern

August 2016

Fabric: 100% cotton woven stripe, interlined with cotton canvas

Pattern: Dore corset from Victorian Underwear package Laughing Moon Mercantile

Year: 1837-1899 (I chose the Dore- earlier shape for Civil War wear but could be later due to my fabric choice)

Notions: cotton thread, steel busk, spring steel bones, grommets, linen tape for lacing, bias tape for binding, silk floss for flossing

How historically accurate is it? 80% given accurate materials for a later time frame with an earlier period shape, machine sewn with short stitch length and hand top stitched and finished

Hours to complete: 22 hours Total (4 hours cutting and fitting, 4 hours machine sewing, 2 hours installing grommets and boning, 8 hours handfinishing, 4 hours flossing)

First worn: September 2016

Total: ~$10 fabric remnant, $20 for busk and bones, notions from stash

Cardinal Red Cloak

Cardinal Red Cloak- Red cloaks were popular in the 18th century and were all the rage in the Regency era.  They are also seen in variations in the Victorian era.  I have made mine more flexible by making the 18th century style hood removable so I can transfer this for other periods.  I also made it a full circle from a cashmere/wool blend so it is truly luxurious and as warm as I could get!  The inner collar blocks all cold breezes when it is inside the hood and the silk lining in the hood stops the wind.  I felt the metal clasp was needed as from my experience I am strangled by ties or have shot buttons across the room from heavy cloaks.  The hood pictures look odd because when I added the head form it was too tall, when I finally get someone to take real pictures of me wearing this I will update.

red-cloak-side red-cloak-clasp red-cloak-side-tall red-cloak-tall-head-front red-cloak-tall-head-back

Historical Sew Monthly

The Challenge: Red

November 2016

Fabric: Cashmere/Wool Blend, Coat Weight and crosswoven silk taffeta for hood lining

Pattern: Full Circle to fit wearer, collar and hood drafted from 18th century drawing and pictures of museum pieces

Year: 18th-19th century (intentionally made for multiple periods)

Notions: silk thread, cast brass clasp

How historically accurate is it? 90% given accurate materials and hand sewn throughout but made fuller than originals

Hours to complete: 20 hours of handsewing

First worn: November 2016

Total: $80 fabric, notions from stash

Historical inspiration images…

18th century red wool cloak at Williamsburg

18th century red wool cloak at Williamsburg

1860 red wool skating cape

1860 red wool skating cape

1800 red wool cloak, silk lined hood with inner collar

1800 red wool cloak, silk lined hood with inner collar

Cloak, 1770, red wool with wool plush trim

Cloak, 1770, red wool with wool plush trim

Cloak, 1770, red wool with wool plush trim, hood detail

Cloak, 1770, red wool with wool plush trim, hood detail

1890 red wool cape with metal clasp

1890 red wool cape with metal clasp

Suffragette Ensemble

Suffragette Ensemble

This is what I wore to cast my ballot this year in honor of our great-great-grandmothers who fought for our right to vote for so long.

I Voted!

I Voted!

votes-for-women

The underlying components: 1910’s blouse and skirt:

elsie-blouse-full-front

Historical Sew Monthly

The Challenge: Heroes

October 2016

Fabric: Cotton/wool blend skirt, Satin ribbon sash, straw hat

Pattern: Sash sewn together satin ribbons, self drafted skirt pattern, “Elsie” WWI blouse

Year: 1915

Notions: cotton thread, satin ribbons, fabric ink, feathers and ribbons for hat

How historically accurate is it? 90% given accurate materials, machine sewn with short stitch length and hand top stitched and finished, hat all hand sticthed

Hours to complete: 10 hours Total (skirt, sash, and hat- not including the blouse that was used for an earlier challenge)

First worn: November 2016- early voting

Total: ~$30 fabric remnant, notions from stash and purchased ribbon and feathers

Historical inspiration images…

1916 casual dress suffragette

1916 casual dress suffragette

1915 USA Suffragettes

1915 USA Suffragettes

wwi-blouse-modesty-brooch1916-ad

“Peter Pan” late 1920’s dress

“Peter Pan” dress- this dress was started in January at our Seamstress Boot Camp Draping weekend- rayon twill seemed the perfect thing for draping on the bias and I started with the cowl neck then found that the fabric wasn’t enough (only about 1.5 yards) to swoop from front to back so I decided to cut it off in a zig zag to create godets out of what was left- thus the name peter pan since that is what it looked like at that point.  After piecing the godets and using bits for the petal sleeves I had about 6″ of fabric left.  I decided on a lot of the details by looking at late 20’s pieces.

This one is for time travel- later than anything else I have made to date and perfect for a Sunday drive or picnic. 🙂

peter-pan

Historical Sew Monthly

The Challenge: Travel

June 2016

Fabric: 100% rayon twill

Pattern: Draped on the dress form- started during our Seamstress Bootcamp and finished many months later

Year: late 1920’s

Notions: silk thread

How historically accurate is it? 90% given accurate materials for early 30’s and bias drape, cowl neck and godet hem, machine sewn and hand finished

Hours to complete: 22 hours Total (3 hours draping on the form and cutting, 3 hours machine sewing and resewing, a few months of being hauled around in pieces and for hand finishing, 16 hours handsewing)

First worn: September 2016 at Downton Abbey Garden Party

Total: ? inherited 30’s fabric remnant and silk thread

Historical inspiration images…

1920s-dress-pattern

1920s-dress-pattern

Chorus Girls 1927

Chorus Girls 1927

vionnet handkercheif dresses

vionnet handkercheif dresses

Madeleine Vionnet lilac ombré chiffon bias-cut cocktail gown, ca. 1927. Simple slip-like gown with slightly ruched bodice to either side of the central inset point. Skirt falls in gored handkerchief pleats, the V-neckline and armholes edged with simple silver picot thread, integral petticoat.

Madeleine Vionnet lilac ombré chiffon bias-cut cocktail gown, ca. 1927. Simple slip-like gown with slightly ruched bodice to either side of the central inset point. Skirt falls in gored handkerchief pleats, the V-neckline and armholes edged with simple silver picot thread, integral petticoat.